Organization

No 4. The Most Simple Time Management System

Years ago, I attended a Franklin Covey, time management course, which has been one of the best investments I ever made in myself.  It forever changed the way I approached my daily, weekly and monthly planning and was the beginning of my quest for ultimate productivity.  The course inspired me to read The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, which became a bible to me; a book I read, outlined and studied for over two years. 

One of the core concepts is the Four Quadrants (see diagram below).  The top row represents important tasks, the bottom row, unimportant tasks; the left column urgent tasks and the right, not-urgent.  The goal is to shift our focus away from unimportant and urgent tasks and create increasingly more space for Quadrant 2 activities, which are important and not urgent.  In essence, we do “first things first,” essential tasks before they become critical. 

Quadrant 2 tasks are all the things that drive our business and often require large blocks of time: planning, revenue-generating activities, business and relationship development, identifying new opportunities, underwriting projects, design time, etc. 

The Four Quadrants - Franklin Covey

The Four Quadrants - Franklin Covey

While making a daily to-do list is helpful, doing the most important things first assures we create consistent space for daily action toward the attainment of our long-term goals.  We can easily become bombarded responding to email, messages, and interruptions.  Most emails and messages are not urgent, and many are unimportant or imply an urgency that is not consistent with our priorities.  In my next blog post, I will expand on this concept of working in shifts and “the Monk Morning.”

I worked at Cisco Systems for six years and, during that time, I learned that our CEO, John Chambers, who remains one of my heroes, set a daily goal to do just three things.  Building on this process, I refined my daily schedule to a simple, four-item task list.  To help narrow my selections, I ask myself the question, “what four things can I do today that will leave me feeling effective and joyful.”

Simple Daily Time Management System:

 •    Meditation and Movement (non-negotiable)

1)    Quadrant 2 task (1) - ex: Write blog and Social Media for online retail business – 1 hour

2)    Quadrant 2 task (2) – ex: 4 calls to new suppliers or equity partners – 1.5 hours

3)    Quadrant 1 task or an investment in myself – ex: research, reading, etc. – 30 min

4)    Personal item or an additional Quadrant 1 or 2 task

 Tactics that have helped elevate my focus and productivity:

-    Break things down into bites – staring at a list that is too long leads to disappointment and stress (as a over-achiever, this is my most challenging parameter to remember)

-    Restrict email to specific intervals – I check three times/day

-    Minimize distractions - only use notifications for meeting reminders, turn all others off

-    Be flexible – Work ebbs and flows, at times you have five, six or maybe only three items

-    This is real life - include necessary personal items in your daily lists

-    Embrace imperfection - some days are overwhelming and some days we have to respond to incoming distractions and emergencies.  Be gentle with yourself; tomorrow is a new day. 

Another of my favorite business philosophers is the late Jim Rohn who said, “failure is not a cataclysmic event that happens overnight, it is a few errors in judgment, repeated every day.” Inversely, success is a series of daily disciplines that ultimately bring greater happiness and the fulfillment of our long-term desires.

No. 1 - Renewal of Spring

In the modern west, January 1, is considered the annual beginning while in many other communities and cultures, spring and the Spring Equinox represent rebirth, bringing cleansing, fertility and the planting and budding of new seeds.

The modern, Gregorian Calendar, was introduced by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582.  Before, the Roman Julian Calendar had been the dominant system proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC.  The Gregorian Calendar is adopted in most countries, although traditional lunar, solar and lunisolar calendars remain in use throughout Africa, Asia and parts of Europe to recognize religious festivals and holidays. 

Calendars play a critical role in the life cycle and workflow of agriculture and the celebration of the seasons. Depending on the location of a community and its orientation to the sun, will dictate how it organizes itself to harmonize with nature and the cyclical climate.

The zestful feeling of spring and its fever are among us.  It’s a beautiful season, a time to thaw, open the windows and enjoy.  The welcome warmth of this cherished moment brings communion, a sense of joy and gratitude, energy and excitement.  Spring is also a time to reflect, ground and plan for the coming year. 

Here are some questions I’ve been asking myself as I surrender to and celebrate the rebirth of this new year:

-    What does success mean to me?

-    What things did I attract into my life last year and what lessons did they bring?

-    What would I like to leave behind?

-    Are there people with whom I would like to spend more or less time?

-    In what ways would I like to serve my family and my community this year?

-    Is there anyone with whom I have withheld forgiveness? 

-    What is my commitment to self-care? 

-    What things am I committed to working on, starting or finishing?

-    What do I want to create in the world?

These questions are just a few to stimulate a dialog with ourselves to reconnect our intentions and spiritual essence with the cycle of life. 

Do you want to begin a new hobby, create a consistent morning routine, spend more time with specific family members or friends?  Do you want to change your job, professional career or start a business?  The newness of spring reflects the limitless possibilities of our health, lifestyle and emotional state.  Joy and happiness come from within; our ability to create and take ownership of them is within our control.  In my experience, creating space to reflect on my growth, the lessons and blessings life has so abundantly provided and what I want to create, sets the sail for a great year ahead.

What do you want to create in your life and this world?  What do you want to leave behind?  What do you want to attract and therefore, what do you want to become?